Monday, July 30, 2018

5 iPhone Camera Tips I Wish I'd Known...

5 Camera Tips I Wish I'd Known When I Started Blogging





Yes, I use my iPhone for all my photography.  When I first started my blog and sharing my photo's on social media, I didn't have a clue about my iPhone camera.  I considered buying a real camera several times, but when I would ask "what camera do you use?", I would hear over and over again, I use my smart phone. 

 I want you to know that I DO NOT CLAIM to be an expert.  I have no photography training.  These are tips that I've gathered over the last year and a half from different online sources, blogs and from the iPhone manual.  Recently, I've been more of a student.  I've taken some challenges presented to me to become a better photographer with my iPhone.  I've actually surprised myself with some of the results.  I feel certain that most of these tips will apply to any smart phone, however my experience is with the iPhone.  So with that being said, here are the 5 tips that I've personally implemented into my iPhone photography for sharing on social media.  


#1

Always take several photo's of your subject using the phone camera!  What?  I thought that was what we were talking about!  What I mean is don't take the photo from within the social media app.  You will not have the editing control that you do with the iPhone camera.  Also, professional photographer's take 100's of shots to capture one that's perfect.  This may sound so simple but a lot of posts are one shot and done.





#2


Focus and Exposure are automatically built into your phones camera.  However, as smart as your camera is, it doesn't know what your subject is.  You have to touch your finger to the subject on the screen to show where you want the camera to focus.  Then you can adjust the exposure by moving your finger up or down.





 If you plan to take several shots, you will want to lock the focus by holding your finger on the screen until the AE AF Box appears at the top of the screen.  This will keep the focus until you are done with that subject.




This is particularly important information when taking interior shots.  If the light is coming into the room through a window, the exposure will be set based on the light in the window automatically.  This leaves the rest of the room in the dark.  So you will want to touch your finger to a dark area and set the exposure (by sliding your finger up on the screen) so that that area of the room is visible.  Also, don't over expose the shot.  You can always increase the exposure when you edit the photo.  



This photo was taken without adjusting the exposure



Here I placed my finger on the darkest area of the screen and slide my finger up until the exposure was revealing the items on the table more clearly.  



 #3

Don't Zoom!  Don't Flash!  Ok that's two tips!  When you Zoom, you will reduce your resolution.  This has been a huge mistake for me.  Instead of using the zoom, you want to get as close to your subject as possible.  When you can't get as close as you would like, take the photo anyway and then during the editing process, CROP.   This is something that I rarely did until recently.  Cropping will reduce the resolution as well, but not as drastically as the zoom will.  You can purchase zoom lens attachments for your iPhone camera.   This is something I've not invested in.  Most of my photography is home décor, so I've not felt the need for this added zoom.  I've seen OOWA and Olloclip recommended.  Again, I don't have personal experience with them.

Using natural light is best for all photography.  The flash will almost always overexpose the subject.  Just don't use it.    


Here is an example of cropping the photo to bring the subject in closer.  If I had gotten this close to him, his head would have disappeared.


#4


Use a tripod and remote shutter control.  This is one of the best tips I've implemented in my home décor photography.  Here are some reasons why:  #1 - you will not have blurry photo's when the camera is steady.  #2 - you can get level with your subject just by adjusting the tripod up or down.  No more getting down on your knees or lying on the floor.  It's best to be level with your subject, especially when photographing home décor.  Here is a link to the tripod I use.  It comes with a wireless remote control camera shutter for smartphones.  It's light weight and so inexpensive.  I highly recommend it.


Fully extended, the tri-pod measures 49 inches tall



It collapses to only 16 inches long

Wireless Remote Control Camera Shutter for Smartphones
Is include with tri-pod
This assures not movement when snapping the photo.



If you don't want to use a remote shutter control.  You can use the volume button on your iPhone to snap a picture.  Be sure that your body is as stable as possible by spreading your feet apart and hold the phone level with your subject for a more appealing view.  One mistake most people make is holding the phone eye level when snapping the photo.



#5

Edit your photos!!!  I recommend using one of the many apps available to edit.  I personally use Aviery.  It's very easy for an amateur like myself to navigate and I feel I have a lot of control with this app.  I also have Snapseed and find it simple as well.  Lightroom CC is another highly recommended editing tool.  I personally haven't taken the time to get comfortable with it.   Remember, to crop your photo's to edit out undesirable content.  I try to use the same basic edits with all my photo's to keep them somewhat consistent.  




I hope these tips are helpful to you.  I wish I had known these simple tips when I first began sharing on Social Medial and writing my blog.  Hopefully, I will replace the original photo's on my blog one day.  For now, I'll just move forward and try to implement these tips into my future posts.  

I do encourage you to try these tips and practice.  I've known some of these tips for some time but I really started to GET IT when I started practicing.  

Have a great day! 

xoxo, Rachel   

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